Lead by example

Publisher's Note

Publisher’s Note

In this day and age of social media, global reach and a perceived awareness of our planet, you’d think we’d be adopting new tricks regarding our responsibility to ourselves, the environment and those around us.

It would seem to make sense that, as people learn about better ways to treat our planet and each other, we’d focus locally, in our homes or at least within the community we live in, but strangely this doesn’t seem to be the case.

Sadly, this lack of responsibility can be seen as visiting cars drive away from their mountain parking spots after a great day of healthy outdoor recreation on the slopes. What remains for others to deal with are piles of empty pop and beer cans, and scrunched bags from the purveyors of fast junk food breakfasts (and even faster coffee).

This, to me, says that either these litterers have no Internet or TV at home and are truly out of touch with today’s world, or they just don’t give a damn about anyone but themselves. Unfortunately the latter seems to be the case more times than not. The same goes for the people who throw beer cans and other garbage from the chairlift when recycling and trash containers are in plain sight everywhere around the community.

It’s as if many people have an out-of-sight, out-of-mind, doesn’t-directly-affect-me attitude, for this big orb we all call home, even as our environmental awareness is seemingly on the rise.

The same thing can also be said about many people in the work force these days.

“Not in my job description,” seems to be a new catch phrase for those who simply show up to work to collect a cheque. What happened to making a positive difference at work and enjoying what you do?

Is it me or have things changed over the years? I was brought up in a manner and time where you strived to always do your best, you went out of your way to help others, you didn’t litter — period — and you treated everyone with the same unwavering respect whether they’re a parent, friend, co-worker or customer. There was no such thing as “I have nothing to do” at work; you found what needed to be done on your own and you did it.

Going over and above what is expected of you on a daily basis reaps huge rewards in the end, and all you need to do is look around to find things to help with.

Complacency is not a right but a disease. It can only be cured by making a difference in your surroundings and striving to make your space a better place, at home, at work or on the ski hill.

Think outside the box, go out of your way to help others and do the unexpected whenever you can. You’ll be amazed how good it feels.