COVID-19

Canada is easing up its border restrictions ever so slightly

Foreign homeowners are still out of luck

Photo Hermes Rivera

The federal government is easing border restrictions, announcing plans to allow more family members of Canadians and permanent residents to enter the countries on Friday, Oct. 2. 

Starting Oct. 8, adult children, grandparents, siblings of a Canadian or permanent resident will be able to enter the country provided they stay for at least 16 days.  

Those who are in a “committed relationship” for at least a year with a Canadian or permanent resident will also be permitted to enter the country. 

“As health and safety remains our top priority, anyone wishing to enter Canada will be subject to all health measures, including the mandatory 14 day quarantine on arrival,” said Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino. 

Mendocino added the federal government will also be allowing a compassionate-entry program for those looking to enter the country under specific reasons, like to see a dying loved one. International students will also be allowed to enter the country, provided they are studying at their place of learning has been identified by provincial authorities as having a COVID-19 plan in place. 

He cautioned against anyone making travel plans before they get proper authorization to enter the country. Details on the process will be online soon. 

While the border easing should bring joy to some families, there is no word foreign property owners will be able to re-enter the country. 

As reported by SPIN, Sun Peaks Mountain Resort Municipality council and local MP McLeod, who represents Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo riding, have both called for the government to open up the border to international homeowners at an early stage of its border reopening plan. 

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